Mongolia


Submitted by administrator on Mon, 2015-02-23 11:00
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Ch Saikhanbileg, Prime Minister of Mongolia and Head of the National Council, visited the three millionth citizen of Mongolia. The citizen is a girl that goes by the name Kh.Mongoljingoo. Saikhanbileg personally handed her family a certificate stating that she is the three millionth citizen in Mongolia. Citizenship certificates were handed out to 200 other children born at the same as the nation's three-millionth citizen. Check it out HERE.


Submitted by administrator on Thu, 2015-02-19 12:12
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On February 11, 2015 Japan and Mongolia came together and signed a bilateral economic agreement. The agreement is expected to accomplish two goals: to enhance the bilateral relationship and promote the economic development of Mongolia. The quality of Japan and Mongolia’s strategic partnership will only strengthen over time with this peaceful union. This is the first economic partnership agreement for our friends in Mongolia.


Submitted by administrator on Tue, 2012-11-20 11:19
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Late last week, we here at M·CAM got an update from our friends at the Mongolian Academy of Sciences (MAS). During the 2011 H.I.T. and G.I.C. trips to Mongolia, the teams partnered up with Tuul and Badmaar, two Mongolian engineering students at MAS, to recycle glass bottles for use in the construction of a greenhouse. The original plan was to melt the glass into tiles with the use of a kiln. However, the teams learned early in the construction process that temperature gradients and the unreliability of electricity at the site made firing these glass tiles nearly impossible.


Submitted by administrator on Fri, 2012-11-16 12:39
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From the 2011 archives

View the full blog post to see a description of today's Featured Photo and check back every Friday to see more photo's from our trips!


Submitted by administrator on Fri, 2012-11-09 14:46
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From the 2010 archives

View the full blog post to see a description of today's Featured Photo and check back every Friday to see more photo's from our trips!


In traditional terms, Mongolia contains large reserves of mineral resources, livestock, agriculture, textiles and energy production materials. In addition, Mongolia contains large quantities of sunlight, wind, water, recycled materials, agriculture, livestock, buildings and ingenuity. As camel herder Bud described to us, the production of wool is so high and the market price is so low that herders are dumping it into the environment rather than bring it to market. However, value-add production and new uses for the wool could raise the market price and create local business opportunities.


Submitted by administrator on Mon, 2012-10-22 11:29
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This past weekend, M·CAM, Inc. hosted a Mongolian delegation visiting the U.S. to learn about the American democratic process. Mongolian President Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj sent the delegation led by our H.I.T. partner, Battsetseg Shagdar (Mongolia's presidential advisor), to take a look at the campaign process in hopes that it will serve as a model for Mongolia's next presidential elections.


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One of Mongolia's toughest political obstacles is the vast range of their constituency. It is difficult to enact legislation when a large percentage of the population is nomadic and the rest live in urban centers. To aid in bridging this gap, the 2011 Mongolian H.I.T. team spent much of their time in the Selenge Province, the northern-most province in Mongolia, with a nomadic family so as to better understand the needs of a large portion of the Mongolian population. The team of three (Roger Bohon, Riley Little, and Katie Martin) spent ten days experiencing nomadic agricultural life.


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In 2010 the Heritable Innovation Trust program expanded to Mongolia. Ken Dabkowski and David Martin spent three weeks during the summer laying the groundwork for the H.I.T. program. Upon the invitation from Tsend Enkhtuya and the Mongolia National Business Incubator Federation (MNBIF), three communities were introduced to the trust; the South Gobi Desert, the Arkhangai Aimag, and the capital city of Ulaanbaatar. Martin and Dabkowski spent time with camel, horse, and yak herders, agriculturalists, and felters among many others. All together 13 items were added to the trust document.